Keep Your Hair On

Hair Loss
Keep Your Hair On
Keep Your Hair On

Keep Your Hair On

Making sure the hairpiece stays where it should is the last technological hurdle that hair replacement systems have yet to overcome. The oldest method for affixing hairpieces is the friction fit method. A crude version of a friction fit would be the way in which a shower cap cinches over a scalp. While the concept is reasonable, friction fit hair replacement systems do not perform very well without additional help. Normally, men’s hair replacement pieces are aided by some sort of adhesive or added security. This is accomplished by glue, clips, tape or hair weaves. The choice between these methods is dictated first by whether the wearer has hair or not; glues and tapes work best on bald scalp while clips or weaves need existing hair to act as an anchor, and finally the hair replacement system cost.

Adhesives are a Good Choice

Most hairpiece wearers prefer glue adhesives for the high degree of comfort and assurance that the hair replacement system will remain in place for up to two weeks. After 10 to 14 days elapses, however, there is an ever increasing risk that the glue may give loose rather catastrophically. While this a rare occurrence with modern hair replacement systems, it reinforces the importance of routine maintenance.

A similar method to glue is to affix the hairpiece with double-sided tape. This approach is not very comfortable, water-resistant, or durable. Also, the more secure the tape, the more likely it is to leave a sticky residue on the scalp. On the positive side, double-sided tape does not have the displeasing odor that some hair replacement adhesives do, and it allows for easier hair replacement system care.

If You Have Some Hair, Consider Clips and Weaves

For men that have some remaining hair, there are the additional choices of clips and weaves. Clips affix to the underside of the hairpiece and are attached to a crop of hair. Clips can be a very secure method of hairpiece attachment assuming the anchoring hair is sufficiently thick. The tradeoff with clips is that comfort may be sacrificed for security; more clips mean more security but less comfort. Also, there is always a risk that a clip will shift and become visible.

Perhaps the surest way to affix hair replacement systems is through the use of a weave. Just as individual strips are used to weave a basket, the wearer’s natural hair is interwoven with the hair of the hairpiece to create a very secure attachment. Initially when a hairpiece is held in place by a weave it is very secure. Unfortunately as the natural hair grows, the hair replacement system will shift and may need to be readjusted. The major downside to using a weave to affix a hair replacement system is that tight (and thus secure) weaves can pull on the wearer’s natural hair. This can lead to a condition called traction alopecia, which is hairloss due to excessive strain on the hair root. Any procedure that risks accelerating hairloss is usually a major red flag to balding men

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